St Breoke Churchyard

The Lord is my shepherd, he makes me lie down in green pastures, he leads me beside still waters.  He restores my soul.  Psalm 23

St Breoke Churchyard

The Lord is my shepherd, he makes me lie down in green pastures, he leads me beside still waters.  He restores my soul.  Psalm 23

The Grounds

The Churchyard has long been a special place for the local community. A place to remember loved ones and to find refreshment of the spirit in its tranquil setting.

In 2021 work began thanks to a generous legacy given for the maintenance and improvement of the churchyard. A Project Group was set up to oversee this work.

It is our aim to ensure that the future generations can continue to find the blessing and peace of this place.

Phase One

Essential Work

The first phase of the project has been to make the oldest part of the churchyard, which is to the immediate left of the drive, safe to access.

Essential tree work has been undertaken and we are planning to reinstate and improve the path.

We have also uncovered a Jack and Jill boundary wall.

Phase One

Essential Work

The first phase of the project has been to make the oldest part of the churchyard, which is to the immediate left of the drive, safe to access.

Essential tree work has been undertaken and we are planning to reinstate and improve the path.

We have also uncovered a Jack and Jill boundary wall.

Biodiversity

Churchyard habitats

Biodiversity

Churchyard habitats

The churchyard through the seasons is a treasure trove of nature, wild flowers, birds, small mammals, and insects who make it their home.

In the area that has been cleared we have created some insect hotels made of the brash from the tree work.

1 in 7 of the UK’s wildlife species is at risk of extinction. Churchyards are important for their habitats and as refuges for wildlife and plant life. Our churchyard is a precious resource which is helping make a difference.

A recent survey has listed all the wildflowers that have been identified in the church grounds 

Burial Ground

Grave Location Resources

All the graves in the churchyward are listed at www.findagrave.com website which provides further information and some graves have plot photos.  Please access details of the churchyard using the alternative spelling ‘St Breock’. Click here for a list of war graves.

Burial Ground

Grave Location Resources

All the graves in the churchyward are listed at www.findagrave.com website which provides further information and some graves have plot photos.  Please access details of the churchyard using the alternative spelling ‘St Breock’. Click here for a list of war graves.

Conservation Area

Conservation Area

Conservation Areas are designated by local planning authorities under the Planning Acts. Act 1990 defines a Conservation Area as an area of special architectttral or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance. At present there are some 8,500 Conservation Areas in England of which 29 are in the district of North Cornwall. During the preparation of the North Cornwall District Local Plan, the centre of St. Breock was identified as a potential Conservation Area. Following public consultation it was designated as a Conservation Area by North Cornwall District Council on 3 February 1997.

A Praying Place

Floating Prayers

As you sit on the bench by the stream near the front porch you may like to write a floating prayer.

All the materials to do so can be found in the Church porch.

Draw or write a prayer on the glossy side of the paper flower*. Then drop it in the stream as you offer your prayer to God.

*The paper is biodegradable

St Breoke Trail

Come along and enjoy the trail

We have put together a trail to encourage exploration of the churchyard to enjoy the wildlife and nature that the church grounds has to offer.  Trail leaflets are available to take from the church building.

Have fun!

Tree Planting

Magnolia Tree

A Magnolia Tree was planted by Steve and Helen in memory of Tim Gardner who donated the monies for the ongoing maintenance and restoration of the churchyard.

Tree Planting

Magnolia Tree

A Magnolia Tree was planted by Steve and Helen in memory of Tim Gardner who donated the monies for the ongoing maintenance and restoration of the churchyard.

Tree Work

Wild Arborist

All the recent Tree Work has been completed by Toby Lawler Wild Arborist Tree Surgery & Woodland Managment

07568 740 552

The Next Phase

Trail Mapping

In the next phase of the project we plan to map trails of interest around the churchyard to provide information for visitors on the trees, the wildlife and the graves.

There are a number of ways to assist us, from clearing the ivy from the graves, to compiling information on the churchyard.  If you would like to get involved, you can get in contact with Rev Steve Payne.

The Next Phase

Trail Mapping

In the next phase of the project we plan to map trails of interest around the churchyard to provide information for visitors on the trees, the wildlife and the graves.

There are a number of ways to assist us, from clearing the ivy from the graves, to compiling information on the churchyard.  If you would like to get involved, you can get in contact with Rev Steve Payne.

Archive

Conveyance documents and memories of days past

Take a peek at the historic conveyancing document for ‘Moon Close’, a piece of freehold land which was purchased as an addition to the old churchyard.

We also have some memories shared of St Breoke, including details of an inscrption hidden in the Belfry mentined in E H W Dunkin’s Church Bells of Cornwall written in 1878.

St Briocus

Church dedicated to St. Briocus on the 24th September 1259

Work on the church commenced in the 13th century and it was dedicated to St Briocus in 1259 by Bishop Branscombe. Virtual rebuilding in 1677 was necessary because it had fallen in a state of disrepair.

The church was subject to flooding in 1846, 1949 and, most severely, in July 1965 when 5½ inches of rain fell in under 3 hours.

The church was flooded to a depth of 57 inches and closed for almost 12 months for restoration, repair and the construction of a flood prevention scheme.

St Briocus

Church dedicated to St. Briocus on the 24th September 1259

Work on the church commenced in the 13th century and it was dedicated to St Briocus in 1259 by Bishop Branscombe. Virtual rebuilding in 1677 was necessary because it had fallen in a state of disrepair.

The church was subject to flooding in 1846, 1949 and, most severely, in July 1965 when 5½ inches of rain fell in under 3 hours.

The church was flooded to a depth of 57 inches and closed for almost 12 months for restoration, repair and the construction of a flood prevention scheme.

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